Mr Motivator has teamed up with British Glass on a mission to reduce the consumption of microplastics by encouraging the nation to choose glass.

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Posted 1 year ago

This January, Mr Motivator has teamed up with British Glass on a mission to reduce the consumption of microplastics by encouraging the nation to choose glass.

Fitness icon Mr Motivator has launched a January ‘work out’ with a difference as he looks to help consumers to work out how they can produce less microplastics on a daily basis. Mr Motivator has worked with British Glass to produce simple tips that appear in a fitness video launched today. The tips include drying clothes with a clothes airer rather than tumble drying, not putting plastic containers in the microwave and choosing glass over plastic packaged products. Microplastics are tiny plastic particles under 5mm, that occur from the breakdown of larger plastics in the environment and levels of microplastics are currently increasing globally in natural sources.

Microplastics are tiny plastic particles under 5mm, that occur from the breakdown of larger plastics in the environment.

Levels of microplastics are increasing globally in natural sources due to a myriad of factors, including large scale manufacturing pollution and the mishandling of waste, and most microplastic pollution comes from textiles, tyres and city dust, which account for over 80% of all microplastic in the environment. 

Levels of microplastics, and the chemicals they leach have been identified in the human body in the past year. In parallel, the number of microplastics recorded in water and food sources are also increasingly being recorded.

To raise awareness and motivate the nation to change its behaviour, British Glass has partnered with Mr Motivator to highlight ways to reduce household exposure to microplastics. Tips include:

  • Rethink how you drink – although they are called “paper cups”, they have liners which release microplastic particles when exposed to hot liquids*
  • Air dry clothes – a single tumble dryer could be responsible for releasing 120 MILLION microplastic fibres into the air each year*
  • Keep it clean – almost 40% of dust particles in your home are microplastics, so regular dusting and vacuuming reduces household levels*
  • Stop putting plastic containers in the microwave – plastic containers leach chemicals when they’re heated*
  • Swap out plastic for glass – glass packaging cannot break down into the food and drink it contains*

Choosing products packaged in glass can offer a tangible household solution to reduce exposure to potentially harmful chemicals caused by microplastics. 

Professor Jeannette Rotchell, Environmental Toxicologist, University of Hull, said: “Whilst research is still ongoing regarding the specific heath impacts of microplastics, we do know that such contaminants and the chemicals they leach have been detected in our bodies, probably due to exposure via our food and drink. The compound of glass as a material means it is impossible for such leaching to take place between product and packaging, so those looking to reduce their exposure to microplastic can take action today by choosing glass where possible.”

Mr Motivator, added: “It’s 2023 and it’s time to look after yourself and look after the world. This is a workout with a difference and I’m excited to be part of a campaign to reduce microplastic consumption in households across the UK.”

Dave Dalton, CEO of British Glass, added: “At a consumer level, preferencing glass offers a solution for people looking to reduce their day-to-day exposure to microplastics and their future impact. We await the results of scientific studies on the health implications of microplastics, but for now, we can raise awareness of leaching and promote the benefits of glass to prevent microplastic intake levels rising.”

Fact checks 

*Air drying clothes – https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2022/jan/12/tumble-dryers-leading-source-microfibre-air-pollution-hong-kong-plastics

*Hoover – https://www.perchenergy.com/blog/lifestyle/reduce-microplastic-pollution-consumption 

*Bottled water – https://cleanwater.org/2020/07/29/bottled-water-human-health-consequences-drinking-plastic#:~:text=Recent%20studies%20show%20bottled%20water,all%20showed%20traces%20of%20microplastics

*https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0043135419308565 

*Microwave – https://www.perchenergy.com/blog/lifestyle/reduce-microplastic-pollution-consumption 

*https://www.inverse.com/science/microplastics-in-our-food 

*Takeaway mugs – https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0304389420321087   

*https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/36089043/